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20121111
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
in the senate and the way it operated. it was a magnet for a lot of us coming to washington. wandering the halls, and i did not know them all in the 1970's were madeleine albright, stephen breyer, susan collins, lamar alexander. many of the leaders. and in the media today, chris matthews, george will. many of these people got their training in the senate. we were not part of the greatest generation. we have the next best thing. we were trained by them. host: our next call for ira shapiro comes from barry. you have to turn down your set. we are getting feedback. caller: i just turned it down. this is why they had more democrats back then, because of the tea party. they made our government stagnant. they are upset about capitalism. that is what built our country. we send them a strong message. as americans, we need to back up the present by getting more involved with the senate. e-mail in your search senator, your congressman and even the president. -- e-mail your senator, the congressman, and even the president. host: we will leave it there. talk to us a little bit about what barry brought up. it
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
, and we will talk about the economic policy implications of where we are. >> august returns to washington next week, and now we preview the commercial agenda in the land and the relationship with president obama. panelists include a former labor secretary elaine chao and president of the center for american progress, neera tanden. this is half an hour. >> see you again. all right. jared is over there. let me just real quickly -- elaine chao, now at the heritage foundation, is a former secretary of labor. alex brill, senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. neera tanden is the president of the center for american progress, formerly chief policy adviser for hillary clinton and a 2008 and 2016 -- sorry. [laughter] jared bernstein is a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities, former chief economic adviser to joe biden and in 2000 and 20 -- no, sorry. we should have separated you two, actually. >> today is a day for half the purpose of the families. >> -- happy progress of families. >> we have to start with the big question. obviously, we are in a position where
of the national committee can do. would you do interfere in primaries, it is washington dictating and party bosses dictating. you get what you get. look what happens. they heard not just themselves, but they heard the entire party's brand. and enormously talented group of people that did not deserve what they got here. that was the outcome. it looks like democrats probably will pick up a seat. then you get to the house. the house seesawed a little bit. well within the frame of what we were expecting, somewhere between a wash and democrats picked up 10 seats. we had a broad think of anywhere from republicans picking up a seed or two or democrats picking up eight. right now we are looking like it is in the five-eight seats to gain for democrats. i think the gust of wind at the end helped them, too. is he saw a little bit in the evening. early on it looked like republicans were doing very well. there was one. it looks like republicans were going to pick up some seats. then you started seeing -- who would have thought that? alan west losing. it went on, it sort of was kicking back over a little bit to
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> tomorrow on "washington journal" with will talk about immigration reform by republicans and democrats and potential areas of compromise. our get is fawn johnson with "are national journal." followed by a look at the role of money in the 2012 election whofment spent it where and what roles super pacs played. we're joined by managing editor kathy kiely. and tax rates and what tax cuts are expected to expire at the end of the year. lindy paull is our guest. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. next former george w. bush national security adviser stephen hadley said getting america's house in order should be the country's top priority. he also spoke about the wars in iraq and afghanistan and how president obama may be forced to deal with iran. mr. hadley was part of the national security conference hosted by the world affairs council of america. it's about 35 minutes. >> thank you so much. good morning, everyone. welcome, steve. it's a real, real pleasure to have you here this morning. we're going to dive right in. i want to begin first by givi
as a part of the national journal's day after the election conference. from washington, this is 35 minutes. >> it if you wanted to study predicate to see how this is a change in american politics, you could not have done a better than last night which i think we will look back at a political but also social and cultural milestone when they look in the mirror and says we are a different place than we used to be. we have a terrific panel. we will look at the implications of this, the two parties, for our economy, and for the society, but i want to start with three numbers that seemed to encapsulate the elections. 80, 39, 28. barack obama 180% of the combined the the minority voters, which -- barack obama won 80% of the combined minority voters. mitt romney, in losing, have the best showing among white male voters. will delve into this from every possible angle, but let me start with you, dan. let's talk about your thoughts about the implications of these results, both for the republican and minority voters, but also as an incumbent democrat president struggled and cannot in the and get to 40
decided kind of individually. i read the numbers of the status crowe, but i think the those in washington is very different, that a rising republican tide was turned back. democrats are more firmly in control. lessons have been learned from the first four years, maybe. no more mr. nice guy. >> can you expand on that in the fiscal clip and some of the policies? >> i want to look ahead to the future. i do not have a good clear crystal ball here. i think these are all things to be determined. the barack obama reach out to republicans? starting with romney, but really the leadership and some of the key players whom he might be able to work with in a bipartisan way, say john mccain. there are house members and senators. does he reach out? secondly, legislation. does the government from the center out? does the governor from the base over to try to get a majority? on the republican side, how do they respond if obama reaches out? i think he will realize with the the test booklet facing us that he has to do something. how do republicans respond not have as much mcconnell responded? -- how do repu
gerstein, thanks for being on the "washington journal" this morning. guest: happy to do it. take care. >> next, the ethics of embedded >> after that a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. >> recent thri museum of jewish heritage in new york city hosted a conversation on the role of embedded jurne lists. they discuss their role as journalists in iraq afghanistan and columbia. this is about 50 minutes. >> thank you for the introductions. i would like to thank you in advance. we are talking about the ethics of journalists. i am not a journalist. i am a historian. what you guys call this? do you refer to being embedded as -- how do we talk about this? >> an embed means -- you could be with the military and not be embedded. i signed a contract with the military. as far as i know, this is pretty much invented by the military and all this terminology, before that, you would just say, i am reporting with the army. >> there is an indication with embedded that you are living with them and you have shelter, food, and are with them. >> you can rely on them for food
captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, "washington journal" than grover norquist and live at 11:00 a.m., president and mrs. obama take part in veterans day ceremonies at arlington national cemetery. >> i need some help over here -- >> where is sergeant robert gates today? >> we ended up following him after his plane ride for many months. he ended up entering himself into an innovative program at walter reed where they ended up using acupuncture and using meditation and using other techniques to wean them off of all the drugs he was on. through this program, he was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. i really commend the military for two things -- for allowing us to tell this story both of the good and the bad but for recognizing this problem. they recognize there is a problem of over-medication and they're looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. that is sort of poll thesis of the film. the metaphor is that the status quo is not working any to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more on this piece -- tonig
to the journalism problem. i think homicide watch in washington d.c. is another one. instead of everything having to go through a story on the front page, this is a way to apply formula to solving a problem. it is interesting to watch and i defend his right to do what he did. there are questions with regard to how he did it. >> i was wondering if there was more to the question. the professional norms and ethics, there are certain things you cannot do and places you cannot go. the conservative who dresses up, do you think it is valuable to have those people? this era gives those people a reach. there are certain things the rest of us cannot do. they almost do anything. >> absolutely. it is a great question. is he a journalist? is he a hacker? i personally have a slightly more conservative take on what a journalist can and should do. i would prefer to have a trusted force that can synthesize some of that information for me. someone i can follow over a period of time. over time, that writer gains credibility for me. somebody i respect over time. then again, you have to ask yourself, did it have an i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)